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Google & Verizon Team Over iPad Killer Tablet

Lowell McAdam, the head honcho of Verizon Wireless, the biggest mobile phone operator in the US, has confirmed that the company will work with Google into building a tablet PC, something that's reminiscent of Google's Nexus One project.

McAdam told the Wall Street Journal (opens in new tab) that the operator is looking to capture the "next big wave of opportunities", something that has eluded it as it lost out the iPhone and iPad exclusivity to arch-rival AT&T.

Verizon Wireless has instead thrown its weight behind the Android platform and massively pushed the Motorola Droid, which was easily the best selling Android smartphone last year.

It also helped Android establish itself as the fastest growing mobile platform in the last year and second only to RIM's Blackberry ecosystem in the smartphone segment, at least in the US.

Obviously, this Google Tablet story reminded us of the Google Chrome OS tablet draft design that went online back in February 2010. There was a rumour earlier this year at CES 2010 that Google would be releasing tablet PC based on Android OS, something that did not materialise.

McAdam did not reveal when the tablet will be ready or the finer details of the agreement or the device itself. However, he made it clear that the next generation network that the company is working on might be more costly to customers.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.