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Adobe Publishes Open Letter Targeting Apple

Adobe has started an advertising campaign and a letter from its co-founders that aim to respond to Apple's recent onslaught on its longtime partner regarding Flash technology, possibly Adobe's most important asset.

Jobs described Flash as being 100 percent proprietary saying that "While Adobe's Flash products are widely available, this does not mean they are open, since they are controlled entirely by Adobe and available only from Adobe."

Chuck Geschke and John Warnock, who founded the creative software producer more than two decades ago, rebuked Apple's accusations that Flash is a closed system and stressed that Apple's current stand could the future of the web.

They also added that the company "believe[s] that consumers should be able to freely access their favorite content and applications, regardless of what computer they have, what browser they like, or what device suits their needs," the letter reads."

They further stressed the fact that no company, regardless of size or creativity, should dictate what you can create, how you can create or what you can experience on the web; a direct hit at Apple but also potentially an own goal by Adobe.

They ended the letter, which was entitled "out thoughts on open markets" by saying that the real question is "who controls the world wide web?" to which they answer, nobody and everybody.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.