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HTC Wildfire Smartphone Surprises Everyone

Smartphone manufacturer HTC has sneakily unveiled a new smartphone called the HTC Wildfire which looks like the HTC Desire only stockier and smaller and popularises the trend seen with the N97 (and the N97 Mini) and the X10 (and its Mini version).

The Wildfire, which we want to call Desire Mini, has a 81mm screen which unlike the Desire, isn't an AMOLED type. At a mere 320 x 240px, its screen resolution is a five times less than the HTC Desire.

The Wildfire will be powered by a slower 528MHz Qualcomm processor possibly from the MSM range, and will have a deliberate focus on social networking, a sign that the handset may aim at cash-strapped users who want the HTC Desire but can't afford it.

Yet, it still comes with WiFi, GPS, HSDPA, Android 2.1 with HTC's Sense UI, a range of colours (red, white and black) and a five megapixel camera and photo flash.

There's also a built in torch app, a FM radio, a microSD slot and the obligatory 3.5mm headphone jack and microUSB charging port.

The phone will be available in Q3, that's in a couple of months. It leaves us with two questions; how much will it cost on PAYG? Will it replace the HTC Smart? Will it undercut the HTC Legend?

The latter is available from Vodafone (opens in new tab) for only £20 per month on a two year contract with 100 minutes, 500 texts and 500MB of mobile internet and webmail.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.