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£340 PANASONIC Viera TX-L32S10 32" Full HD LCD TV

The Panasonic Viera TX-L32S10 32" Full HD LCD TV is a premium television in the 32-inch class, offering innovation, quality, and sophisticated design.

Built around a top-quality IPS Alpha LCD panel, the Panasonic Viera TX-L32S10 produces a picture that can be seen from anywhere in the room thanks to its 178-degree viewing angle. And that picture is truly worth seeing! The 50,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio offers a cinematic experience that will bring out the very best in your movies. The flatscreen display boasts a Full High Definition resolution (1920 x 1080), ensuring every last detail of a Blu-ray movie is pixel-perfect.

The Panasonic Viera TXL32S10 features powerful 20-watt stereo speakers with V-Audio Surround, so you can be sure the sound will match the picture. The built-in digital tuner opens up the endlessly entertaining world of Freeview, and you can even tune into digital radio stations.

One of the most useful features of the Panasonic Viera TX-L32S10 32" Full HD LCD TV is its SD memory card slot, which permits you to play back content from a flash memory card, be it digital photos or video. The 3 HDMI connectors also make it easy to attach a next-gen game console. Upgrade your home entertainment with this fine HDTV!

Buy the PANASONIC Viera TX-L32S10 32" Full HD LCD TV from Dixons for only £340 (opens in new tab).

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.