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Cheapest Windows 7 Ever : Amazon Slashes Price Of Family Pack To £103

Online retailer Amazon has cut the price of the Windows 7 Home Premium Family Pack bundle to £103, a price that is £47 less than the recommended retail price and includes three licences.

This means (opens in new tab) that the per licence price is only £34.33, the cheapest we've seen yet for any legal Windows 7 licence, educational or not.

Given that the full version of Windows 7 Home Premium costs £110 and the single licence can be bought for just over £81, the triple-licence version is a proper bargain.

The deal includes both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions and comes on a single DVD media and is destined for the UK Market; it is currently the best selling OS at Amazon.

Windows 7 has been launched back in October 2009 and has been one of the most successful Windows iterations to date.

As for Windows 7 Home Premium family pack, it was rumoured that Microsoft was mulling cancelling it altogether because of market conditions but it seems that this decision has been overturned.

It is advisable to do a clean install rather than an upgrade and Windows 7 HP may not be compatible with devices prior to the 10-year old Windows XP.

Home users may also consider getting Microsoft Office 2010 Home and Student version which is also available with three user licenses and cost £88.65 from Amazon (opens in new tab).

Désiré Athow
Désiré Athow

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.