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Lenovo Denies Plans For 23-inch Tablet

A spokesperson for Chinese computer maker Lenovo has confirmed that the company has no plans to launch a 23-inch tablet as reported on Tuesday by UK tech news website, TechRadar.

Writing to PCMag.com (opens in new tab), Raymond Gorman of Lenovo, said, "It is usually not our practice to talk about unannounced products, but in this case I will tell you that we have no plans to introduce a 23-inch tablet."

Lenovo marketing specialist William Cai was quoted by TechRadar (opens in new tab) as saying that the company would bring out a 23-inch tablet which would be an all in one touchscreen computer, that could be moved around the house very easily and even carried on the train in a backpack.

The closest thing to that on the market is the Microsoft Surface which, in its current version, would normally need two people to carry around and costs around ten times your average tablet.

How likely is it that Lenovo will launch such a monster? Not very likely, but then the company has, over the last year, launched at least two innovative products, the Skylight Laptop, an ARM-based tablet that's not only cheap but also very light, and the Lenovo IdeaPad U1, a hybrid tablet that can double as a laptop simply by docking it.

The largest tablet devices launched on the market very rarely go beyond 15-inch in order to maintain portability; most tend to stick to 10-inch or smaller.

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.