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Waiting For Galaxy S II? Price Of Original Galaxy S Dips To £250

The price of the original Samsung Galaxy S has dropped significantly to a mere £249.90 with a free £10 top up at online retailer and Carphone Warehouse affiliate, E2Save.

The deal is available on pay as you go (opens in new tab) with Orange, the phone comes with free delivery and costs an additional £10 if purchased on O2; no other networks are included in the deal.

The Samsung Galaxy S was the company's first true Android hit and proved to be very popular as it is excellent value for money.

It comes with a Samsung Hummingbird Cortex A8 system on chip clocked at 1GHz, 512MB RAM, 8GB onboard storage,a 4-inch WVGA Super AMOLED screen, Wi-Fi, 3G, GPS, a 5-megapixel camera.

Compared to the Samsung Galaxy S II, it has half the number of cores, half the memory and half the onboard storage and no front-facing camera.

But it does have the same screen resolution and costs half the estimated price of the Samsung Galaxy S II. In addition, the phone will be upgradable to Gingerbread from the current Froyo, later this year, which will bring it even closer to its successor.

At this price, the Samsung Galaxy S doesn't have much competition. The HTC Desire costs roughly the same but comes with less memory and a smaller screen, while the Sony Ericsson Xperia X10 has a higher screen resolution and bigger screen but its system on chip is not up to scratch.

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.