Skip to main content

Acer Drops Price Of Iconia W500 With Keyboard

Those looking for a Windows-equivalent version of the Asus Eee Pad Transformer should rejoice as Acer has apparently slashed the price of the Iconia W500 with keyboard to £434.88, a saving of almost £100 on the suggested retail price.

The device, which is available at Amazon (opens in new tab), is a WiFi only model and will suit those looking for a tablet that can transform into a notebook and vice versa.

The W500 comes with a dual core AMD C-50 clocked at 1GHz with an onboard Radeon GMA6250 graphics module, 2GB DDR3 RAM, a 32GB SSD, a 10.1-inch LED monitor and a screen resolution of 1280x800 pixels.

Add in a microSD card reader, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 3.0, a 1.3-megapixel front facing camera, an Ethernet port, a USB port, and a three cell battery, Windows 7 Home Premium and you end up with a pretty decent machine.

Unfortunately, you will have to put up with Acer's long list of applications including ePower & eRecovery management, Acer Clear-Fi, Crystal Eye and some trialware as well.

Acer also saw it fit to include a one year international travellers warranty for free. As for dimensions, the W500 is thicker and heavier than the Asus Eee Pad Transformer and other 10-inch netbooks we've seen in the past.

The Asus' tablet & docking station combo has been a very popular seller at Amazon, DSGi and a number of other resellers as stocks are very thin on the ground.

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.