Skip to main content

3 Things Samsung Could Do To Improve Its Series 5 Chromebook

The first Samsung Series 5 Chromebooks are set to be launched on Friday and are likely to be rather popular based on Amazon UK preliminary preorder figures we've got hold of.

At £349 for the WiFi and £399 for the 3G version, the Samsung Series 5 is still quite expensive though, and if the Korean Chaebol wants to propel the range into the same league as the N145 Plus or the N210 Plus, it will have to improve on a few things.

A significant effort with regards to pricing is certainly the priority. Although the Wi-Fi only Series 5 Chromebook comes with slightly better hardware specs compared to say, the Samsung N150 Plus netbook, this comes at a very steep price, a near 46 per cent premium.

There's also the screen resolution and screen size; we'd personally prefer a 1366x768 resolution on a 11.6-inch (as Acer did) to 1280x800 pixels on a 12.1-inch display, because a higher pixel density produces sharper pictures and text and you can always switch to a lower resolution. Furthermore, we prefer the more common 16:9 to the less common 16:10 screen ratio.

Another improvement that Samsung can bring onboard is swapping the optional VGA port for a proper HDMI one like the Acer Chromebook. Once again, you can always switch to VGA or DVI if you have HDMI, but not vice versa.

What else could Samsung do to improve the Series 5 Chromebook? Let us know.

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.