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Hurry Up! Dell Drops Price Of Streak 7 Tablet To £169

Dell has cut the price of its Streak 7 tablet, a competitor to the Samsung Galaxy Tab, to a mere £169, a 32 per cent reduction from its original selling price of £249; the offer - which is for the Wi-Fi only version of the device - is only available for the next few hours at Dell's group buying website, Dell Swarm (opens in new tab).

The Streak 7 comes with a 1GHz Nvidia Tegra 2 SoC, 16GB onboard storage, extendable to 48GB using a microSD card. There's also a five megapixel rear camera with HD video recording, a front facing 1.3-megapixel camera, a 7-inch WVGA capacitive touchscreen with Corning Gorilla glass display, Wi-Fi, a 2780mAh battery and runs on Android Froyo 2.2 with over the air upgrade capability.

The Streak 7 is the follow up to the Streak 5 and unlike the latter (or the Samsung Galaxy Tab) doesn't feature any phone capabilities, which is a sad omission. And at full price, the tablet is twice as expensive as the Agora 7-inch tablet and £70 more expensive than the Andy Pad Pro which comes with a 1024x600 pixel screen.

Even more worrying is the fact that there are 10-inch tablets like the Advent Vega or the Hannspree Hannspad, both of which are 10-inch tablets with better screen resolution which cost significantly less than the Streak 7, albeit with a less refined finish and some missing bits (like a front facing camera or onboard storage). But for many, that will be an acceptable compromise as the price difference - more than £100 - justifies it.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.