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Apple ARM'ed To Kill Mac Pro Range?

Behind the rumours that Apple's Mac Pro range could follow in the steps of the Xserve family and vanish from Apple's portfolio, lies the fact that Apple appears to be giving up on Intel and the x86 architecture completely.

The company irreverently abandoned the PowerPC architecture a few years ago and appears to be following the same route again. Like the Xserve server range, Mac Pro workstations use the formidable firepower of Intel's processors to satisfy graphics designers and animators that Apple has been serving for so long.

But the company's main cash cow is now mobile and its defacto architecture is now ARM. Apple has purchased P.A. Semi and Intrinsity to help it build its long term processor strategy, and although both ARM and Apple would not confirm whether the latter is a licensee of the former, there's no doubt about it.

The A5 that powers the iPad 2 and the iPhone 4S, we can ascertain, certainly gives the Macbook Pro and the Mac Pro a run for their money, and we wouldn't be surprised if the next generation A6 finds its way into the iMac and the Mac Mini (ed: even maybe with external graphics cards).

After all, Apple did swap Intel for ARM in Apple TVs without anyone uttering a complaint, and with the gradual iOS-isation of the Mac OS platform, we suspect that Mac OS X 10.8 - which is already being tested will confirm that trend.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.