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Half of UK Population Owns a Smartphone

Figures show that almost half of the population in UK owns a smartphone with Android, Google's smartphone operating system, running on half of them, RIM's BlackBerry handsets second with 22.5 percent while Apple's iOS platform comes third with 18.5 percent of the market.

The sale of smartphones is rising rapidly as well. The research courtesy of Kantar Worldpanel ComTech (opens in new tab) showed that over a three month period to 2nd October, smartphones accounted for about 70 percent of the mobile phone market.

In addition, more and more Britons are connecting to the web via handheld devices which provide data access services on the go.

However, for the Finnish company Nokia, the last three months were rather disappointing with the sale of their smartphones declining. Its Symbian operating system represents a mere 6 percent of sales compared to 20 percent a year earlier.

Apple is also facing a similar fate, its share in sales declined from 33 percent to 18.5 percent; this doesn't necessarily mean that Apple sales are decreasing, more that the Smartphone market is increasing faster than Apple's.

But this could be a temporary trend, with Nokia introducing its latest smartphone models, which will run on Microsoft's new Windows Phone software. The new Nokia Windows Phone devices will be available for sale in the UK from mid-November.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.