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Microsoft To Drop Start Button From Windows 8 Consumer Preview

Microsoft's forthcoming desktop operating system, Windows 8, may not have a start button on the home screen according to a report published in the Verge (opens in new tab) by Tom Warren, and based on pictures from PCbeta (opens in new tab).

The screen captures were obtained from the Consumer Preview of Windows 8 (also known as the official Beta) which is set to be launched at the end of the month. Until then, the start button available in the Metro UI was a trimmed down version of the Windows XP/Windows 7 style. It only offered access to search, settings, share and devices.

The new Windows 8 user interface is likely to feature a "Windows superbar" on the whole bottom area. The Start button will no longer be there to lead users to all the sub applications on the computer (ed : although we're convinced that there will be loopholes and shortcuts to allow that to happen).

The latest version of Windows 8, build 8220, also shows a "charms bar" which is a group of transparent icons that provide a shortcut to key features as well as a new ImmersiveUI icon set, a new background set for the start page as well as a new branding and a new Apps menu template.

The start button was one of the most salient points in Windows 95 and first appeared in the Windows Chicago Build 58 back in August 1993, almost 19 years ago.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.