SourceForge removes Anonymous operating system

Open source repository Sourceforge has removed the controversial Anonymous Linux distribution from its site.

The Anonymous OS has been hailed as a fake by several of the official-ish anon spokespersons and Twitter accounts, with the most quoted phrase claiming that the release was "wrapped in Trojans."

Despite this, there are some considering whether this is merely an unsanctioned branch of Anonymous, as the group has stated ad nauseum: there is no leadership - especially considering recent events - so whether every Anon agrees or not, this malware filled distribution may have been some anarchic members doing it simply for the lulz.

Sourceforge commented on the takedown on its blog, stating that it was not based on the potential Anonymous ties, but on the security of the system: "We looked at the project, and decided that although the name of the project was misleading (we see no evidence that it is connected with Anonymous) it appeared, on initial glance, to be a security-related operating system, with, perhaps, an attack-oriented emphasis. We have, in the past, taken a consistent stance on "controversial" projects - that is, we don't pass judgement based on what's possible with a product, but rather consider it to be amoral - neither good nor bad - until someone chooses to take action with it."

"However, as the day progressed, various security experts have had a chance to take a look at what's really in this distribution, and verify that it is indeed a security risk, and not merely a distribution of security-related utilities, as the project page implies."

Sourceforge then explained that ultimately it removed the OS based on the fact that the supposed Anonymous release is not transparent in what it is for. It purports to be a security focused and somewhat script kid friendly OS, but in fact it has a high risk of digital infection if downloaded.

"We believe that this is the right decision in this case, but will continue to dig into it, to ensure that we've gone the right direction," concluded Sourceforge.