IBM Introduces PureSystems IT Maintenance Product

IBM is going up against rivals such as Oracle and HP with its latest innovation, PureSystems.

The line of products is touted as a "major step forward in a new, simpler era of computing", and offers clients an alternative to the current enterprise computing model, where multiple systems are both costly and a headache to set up and maintain.

In a press statement, IBM noted that its research found that 70 per cent of IT budgets are spent on operations and maintenance, leaving little to invest in innovation elsewhere. The research also claims two-thirds of enterprises fall behind while deploying new IT systems, and that it can take up to four to six months to establish hardware and software infrastructure.

Enter PureSystems, which boasts three major advances to both simplify deployment and tackle high costs. These advances are a "scale-in" system design, which integrates the server, storage and networking into an automated machine, providing a single-view management system and intuitive set up.

It provides for increased density, with IBM noting that PureSystems can handle twice as many applications compared to some other IBM systems, effectively doubling the computing power per square foot of data centre space.

PureSystems also boasts software which facilitates the automatic handling of tasks such as configuration and upgrades, to save time and effort. It also comes cloud ready, out of the box, allowing for the swift deployment of scalable private cloud offerings.

Steve Mills, senior vice president and group executive of software and systems at IBM, commented: "With its new scale-in design and built-in expertise, PureSystems represents an important advance in the evolution of computing."

"By tightening the connections between hardware and software, and adding incomparable software know-how, PureSystems is designed to help clients free up time and money to focus on innovation that many businesses cannot address due to ever rising costs and staffing needs in the traditional data centre."