Late News: O2 to Ship Samsung Galaxy S3, PlayStation Vita Gets Skype, Facebook Celebrates 901 Million Active Users

24 hours after Vodafone, rival mobile phone operator O2 has confirmed that it will be selling the Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone via Twitter and called it the next Samsung Galaxy rather than the S3. The phone will be launched on the 3rd of May at a Samsung Mobile Unpacked event in London and we've been invited along a number of news websites. There's already a video of the Galaxy S3 which has been leaked which shows that the phone looks more like an evolution of the existing design.

The Skype VOIP service will - as of tomorrow - be available in Europe on the PlayStation Vita, allowing Sony fans to make voice and video calls for both 3G and Wi-Fi versions of the touch screen handheld. The download will be completely free and available from the social category of the PlayStation Network. The service will happily run in the background, not affecting any other applications or games you might be using.

Iran's oil ministry has admitted that its website and systems came under cyber-attack at the weekend. The Mehr News Agency, the semi-official arm of the Iranian regime, reported yesterday that Iran's main oil terminal on Kharg Island was disconnected from the internet after the attacks were detected, and targeted email systems were also taken offline. Iran was keen to emphasise that the systems were taken down by themselves as a precaution, not by the cyber-criminals.

For a part-time project that started off in Zuckerberg's dorm room, the ex-Harvard student has certainly done well for himself - especially since celebrating the news of acquiring an impressive 901 million active Facebook members under his social networking belt. Just two months ago, Facebook had over 845 million active users logging into the site each month along with 500 million members using the social network on a daily basis.

Toshiba has secured the rights to a large portion of the uranium being mined by development company GoviEx, at the Madaouela uranium mine in Niger. The deal involves Toshiba handing over $40 million to GoviEx, funding the initial extraction and processing of the uranium. Three quarters of that money comes from the purchasing of GoviEx bonds, while the final $10 million comes from a loan of 0.2 million pounds of uranium.