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Foursquare Adds NFC Functionality To Its BlackBerry App

Foursquare is breathing life back into BlackBerry, by bridging the cross-platform divide with its updated application. The newest version now features the Near Field Communication ability, which until recently, was only available in the Android Ice Cream Sandwich smartphone app and its supported devices. The release of version 3.9 also recognises the power of direct messages - with Foursquare notifications now displayed in the BlackBerry inbox.

"You can share places and tips among other BlackBerry and Android devices (or even check in at places with NFC stickers), with a simple tap of your phone", explained Foursquare in a blog post on the update.

The update also includes some bug fixes, in addition to faster performance, but more importantly, it is its NFC capability that has helped put the BlackBerry back in poll position - allowing users to check-in, if a place has a special NFC sticker.

"We've also added NFC capabilities to the app, which means you can share places and tips among other BlackBerry and Android devices (or even check in at places with NFC stickers), with a simple tap of your phone."

However, whilst a pretty nifty tool for those who love to let the whole world know exactly where they are, the feature is only limited to those using either the BlackBerry Bold 9900 and the BlackBerry Curve 9370 (Curve 9360, in the UK).

Fancy sharing tips with other like-minded check-in buddies with the added power of NFC? Course you do - you can download the app here.

Source: VentureBeat

Mariel Norton is a self-confessed girly geek with a penchant for technology, and joins ITProPortal with just over a year's experience under her online belt. A copywriter by day and a freelance writer by night/weekend, Mariel is an avid volunteer - lending her charitable services throughout the world. Specialising in social media, apps, and video games, Mariel hopes to intertwine her love of technology with the English language to produce amusing anecdotes of ambiguous algorithms and alliteration