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IPv4 addresses running out warns Internet Registry

RIPE NCC, the regional internet registry for Europe, Middle East and parts of Central Asia, has announced that the last batch of IPv4 address space has been released days before its projected date, 19 September.

The so-called /8 IPv4 blocks will be distributed to Local Internet Registries, which is equivalent to less than 17 million addresses.

According to Axel Pawlik, managing director of the RIPE NCC and regular ITProPortal blogger (opens in new tab), “The limitations of the pool of IPv4 address space became clear over time, and in the last few years we have been monitoring supplies closely, preparing ourselves and all stakeholders for the next stage of the internet. Reaching the last /8 underlines the importance of IPv6 deployment, which is vital to the future growth of the internet.”

(opens in new tab)IPv6 is hailed as the only way forward by Pawlik who adds “IPv6 vastly increases the amount of address space, helping to enable an exciting turning point in society as internet connected devices become increasingly more sophisticated and commonplace.”

On the World IPv6 day, the 6 June this year (opens in new tab), a number of top web companies, Microsoft, Youtube, Google and Yahoo adopted the protocol which will allow significantly more addresses to be doled out, as it has an addressable space of 128-bit rather than 32-bit.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.

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