Skip to main content

ITPP in Taiwan (day four): Gigabyte clocks new Core i7 system at 6.3GHz & AVer Information targeting education sector

Based on our first few reports from Taiwan, you might be tempted to think that technology in the Asian island nation is all about the consumer end of the spectrum. This would be a false assumption. In fact, the exclusive TAITRA-led press tour I'm currently reporting live from has offered a health mix of mainstream gadgetry and visits with more enterprise-slanted organisations. Today's outings reflect that blend, kicking off with a meeting at Aver Information's headquarters in New Taipei City.

AVer Information

Founded in 2008, AVer Information is hardly out of diapers, yet it's grown to become the number one company in the niche visualiser market in both the US and Western Europe. Targeting this hardware at the education segment in particular, the firm's latest offering is the AVerVision M70 (see video, below), which features 12x optical zoom, one-touch recording at 30fps – the same as the iPhone 5 if you're interested – and most importantly full HD image output of 1080p. It also comes with all-new A+ Suite software for improved PowerPoint integration and handy annotation tools. Barring a few maths and science gurus, teachers tend to be notoriously afraid of technology, but this just might help them snap out of their Luddite ways.

Fruitshop

Fruitshop is certainly one of the more distinctive firms ITProPortal has visited thus far, offering a quirky and at times slightly silly range of iToy accessories, USB flash drives, and other non-essential add-ons. In many ways, the company is the polar opposite of Just Mobile, who I praised yesterday for bucking the unfortunate trend for cheap, disposable mobile extras. Fruitshop's frequently cartoon-like offerings, on the other hand, are the kind of stuff you would buy as a present when in a bit of a panic - but that doesn't necessarily mean that they're bad products.

Indeed, like Just Mobile, design is central to Fruitshop's line, and its accessories are stocked in the gift shop of London's prestigious V&A museum as well as featuring in the UK edition of GQ Magazine. They're certainly not my particular cup of sake but, then again, I'm far from Fruitshop's target audience.

"I'd say 70 per cent [of our buyers are] a girl – a young, pretty girl," said Reads Lin, Fruitshop's design director.

Looking ahead to the holiday season, it's quintessential stocking filler material – if you've got a tech-savvy 12-year old daughter who likes animals and mobile data storage, at least. Plus, someone in Fruitshop's Taiwan HQ makes great coffee. A homeless penguin named Maru and a top-notch brew - what more can a travelling hack ask for?

Gigabyte

Gigabyte represents the largest company I've met with during my time in Taiwan, and the global brand – founded as far back as 1986 – certainly didn't disappoint on the showmanship front. Now, my processor and motherboard expertise is still evolving – to put it politely – but I got into the spirit of Stewart Haston's overclocking demonstration. In particular, the expatriated Liverpudlian and Gigabyte rep showed off the Z77X-UD3H mainboard from his firm's UltraDurable range.

Overclocking, it turns out, is an easy spectacle to appreciate: build the excitement by getting the temperature down to a ridiculous low level, then see how far you can amp up the CPU's processing speed before the computer says no. An Intel Core i7 sits at the heart of the beast and is the reigning overclocking world record holder, with some nutter by the name of Monkey running up a score of 7.032GHz back in May of this year.

Stewart got pretty close to that mark, notching a highly commendable 6.3GHz – pretty ludicrous considering it's meant to max out at around 3GHz and most mobile devices run at well under 2GHz. There's no doubt Mr Haston has a dab hand when it comes to liquid nitrogen, but now it's time to take him up on a bar recommendation. Until tomorrow, ITProPortal Nation.