Hands on: Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 11 & Yoga 13

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Chinese computer giant Lenovo demoed the IdeaPad Yoga 13 earlier this year at CES 2012, and nearly 11 months later is set to debut the hybrid device in the UK for £999, just in time for Christmas.

We spent some time with the IdeaPad Yoga 13 earlier in the year at the Gadget Show, as well as cozying up to its smaller brother, the IdeaPad Yoga 11 which, unlike its bigger brother, is based on Windows RT and will cost only £699 at launch.

Both of them share the same DNA; a streamlined design with the main body of the laptop sandwiched between two coloured panels, the same ability to morph from a traditional laptop to a tablet within seconds by flipping the screen to the back of device, the same compact keyboard with island-style keys, a non-removable battery, a massive touch pad and an equally generous palm rest as well as the same screen resolution at 1,366 x 768 pixels.

External connectivity options are scarce, though: one SD card reader, two USB ports and one HDMI port, plus an audio connector.

The only major external difference you’d notice between the Yoga 13 and the Yoga 11, other than the size, are the air vents on the Yoga 13 which are needed to cool down the Intel Core i5 processor that powers it. The Yoga 11 runs an Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core system-on-a-chip, on the other hand, and has only two tiny air slits on each side of the laptop.

Other noteworthy features we jotted down in our more recent hands-on with the products include a rubbery bezel, two solidly built hinges that can apparently withstand up to 50,000 twists and a nifty yellow connector.