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MWC 2013 : A quick look at the Firefox OS-based Geeksphone Keon & Peak

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We stopped by the Geeksphone booth at MWC to have a look at its budget developer smartphone, the Keon. It will become the first smartphone on the market that runs Firefox OS when it goes on sale in a few weeks, with retail prices between $100 and $150, roughly between £60 and £90.

The Keon runs on a Cortex-A5 SoC, the Qualcomm MSM7225AB, clocked at 1GHz with 512MB of RAM, 4GB of onboard storage, a 1,580mAh battery, a 3.5in 480 x 320 pixels HVGA display, a 3-megapixel camera with flash and a microSD card slot. It will be available for everyone to buy but will be primarily geared at developers.

It looks quite similar to the Alcatel One Touch we saw a few days ago and like the latter, sports a bright orange chassis.

Javier Aguera Reneses, CEO of Spanish-based Geeksphone, told us that he’s confident the smartphone will be a success with the targeted audience.

Geeksphone also had a more powerful device called the Peak on display. It is more powerful than the former with a a dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 MSM8225 SoC clocked at 1.2GHz, with 512MB of RAM, 4GB onboard storage, a 4.3in 960 x 540 pixel display, a 1,800mAh battery and an 8-megapixel camera.

Desire worked at ITProPortal right at the beginning and was instrumental in turning it into the leading publication we all know and love today. He then moved on to be the Editor of TechRadarPro - a position he still holds - and has recently been reunited with ITProPortal since Future Publishing's acquisition of Net Communities.