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MWC 2013 Hands on pictures: Fujitsu F-04E smartphone, the kitchen sink and everything…

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If most of us had to come up with an ideal smartphone, the Fujitsu Arrows V F-04E would almost certainly embody most of it although perhaps not with the same form factor. That smartphone was displayed at MWC 2013 and was unveiled back in November 2012.

It comes with a similar configuration as most smartphones from last year, which leaves us to believe that there will definitely be a major update in the first half of the year, to bring it up to the level of the current crop of super smartphones.

So you get a quad-core Nvidia Tegra 3 SoC clocked at 1.5GHz, a 4.7in 1,280 x 720 pixels display, Android 4.0, 2GB of RAM, 64GB onboard storage plus a microSD card slot (which means you could have up to 128GB of storage), a 2,420mAh battery, a 13.1-megapixel camera with Exmor R sensor, an advanced “human centric engine” that customizes the phone based on the user, a smart fingerprint sensor, NFC plus IPX5/8 water resistance and IP5X dust resistance.

Now the next update will probably bring in an enhanced quad-core SoC (think Nvidia Tegra 4), Android 4.2 Jelly Bean and a full HD display. The rest of the spec, it has to be said, is on par or head of the current top-of-the-range competition.

Desire worked at ITProPortal right at the beginning and was instrumental in turning it into the leading publication we all know and love today. He then moved on to be the Editor of TechRadarPro - a position he still holds - and has recently been reunited with ITProPortal since Future Publishing's acquisition of Net Communities.