Today's Tech: Google gives up porn, robots take our jobs, and Goldman Sachs sends the wrong email

Oops

Goldman Sachs Group Inc. has asked a US judge to order Google to delete a confidential email that was accidentally sent to a stranger's Gmail account.

The email, which was leaked on 23 June, is said to contain "highly confidential brokerage account information" and should be deleted to avoid a "needless and massive" breach of security.

According to Goldman, the email was sent by an outside contractor who had been testing changes to the bank's internal processes regarding new reporting requirements put in place by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

iRobot

The globe has entered a "second machine age" that will see more than half of the world's jobs occupied by robots in the near future, according to scientists working at Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT), Oxford University and Sussex University.

"Before the industrial revolution, it was pretty boring from an economist's point of view, but since the evolution of machines during this time, societies have become more efficient and wealthier," said Erik Brynjolfsson, director at MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy.

Office price hike

Microsoft's August price list has revealed increases of up to 15 per cent for Office 365 enterprise customers.

Those without a software assurance plan will be hit with the largest hikes, whereas those who do will have their prices frozen until the end of their contract.

It's not all bad news though. Existing customers will not experience any price increases when renewing their contracts and anyone who bought Office 365 from Microsoft or through its open licensing programme won't be affected.

Kicking the habit

Google has made changes to its ad network by banning the promotion of pornographic websites.

The ban specifically concerns sites that feature "graphic sexual acts with intent to arouse including sex acts such as masturbation."

A Google spokesperson said that the company has had restrictions on its adult category for some time, but not all industry experts agree.