Fujitsu: Why the UK is helping us push cybersecurity forward

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The security market is one of the fastest growing and evolving technology sectors around today, meaning manufacturers and vendors alike constantly need to have their fingers on the pulse of the latest trends.

At the recent Fujitsu Forum 2017 event in Munich, ITProPortal spoke to Rob Norris, the company's UK security head, to try and understand just how tricky this can be.

Although often recognised for its extensive manufacturing output, Fujitsu has also been a key player in many other sectors too, from retail to self-driving cars. This is backed up by a robust security offering that uses the company's wide-ranging expertise to ensure customer stay safe online.

The theme of Fujitsu Forum was "digital co-creation" - one that chimes well with the company's overall strategy when it comes to security, it seems.

"If you look at the speed of change in the security market as it is, in order to stay abreast of the latest challenges, the latest malware, we recognise that we have to partner more," says Norris, highlighting how Fujitsu's extensive partnerships with start-ups and SMEs is helping push its security profile higher than every before. 

"From a UK perspective...we are growing faster than the market rate (and) Fujitsu is starting to get recognised as a security company within the UK," he adds, "the business is growing and going in the right direction."

Fujitsu's work is also helping to boost the UK's security presence too, Norris notes, a useful place to be as the government continues to invest more and more in cybersecurity protection.

"If you look at what the UK government is doing," he adds, "the rest of Europe is quite envious of what the UK government is doing."

Fujitsu marked this year's event with the expanded release of its Cyber Threat Intelligence platform, which now offers companies a far more and extensive platform to stay secure.

The CTI platform collects intelligence from Fujitsu systems around the world, gathered through ongoing monitoring and assessment of the current threat landscape as well as the company’s technology partners and even intelligence forums. 

In doing so, Fujitsu says that the service can offer the “earliest possible warning” for new security threats, and also offer regular updates on how to combat new and potentially damaging attacks. The company will also regularly share its findings and recommendations through ‘early warning’ threat advisories, daily digests, weekly bulletins and monthly client calls, helping customers to always be prepared for the latest threats.

Looking forward, it's clear to see that Fujitsu is not going to back away from its cybersecurity efforts, with the company also helping push forward the use of AI and biometrics in its research.

Norris notes that, "people now accept biometrics for what it is...people are quite comfortable giving away their biometric footprint...if you look at usernames and passwords, I think that in about 2-3 years, biometrics will replace that."

Ultimately though, Norris is keen to stress that Fujitsu is here to stay when it comes to cybersecurity, and with the amount of major hacks and data breaches seemingly only set to increase, there is a need for a security presence with the knowledge that the company has.

"There's a lot of scare-mongering out there," he says, "but for me, anything that gets the message out there about cyber is a good thing...there's definitely a lot more interest and a lot more awareness about cybersecurity, and it doesn't need huge amounts to address the issues we see today."