Skip to main content

Almost all IT leaders forced to compromise on security

security
(Image credit: Shutterstock / Golden Sikorka)

IT teams are having to make security concessions to help employees maintain productivity. This is according to a new report from HP, which argues that now is the worst possible time to be lenient on security, with the volume and sophistication of threats on the rise.

The HP Wolf Security Rebellions & Rejections report, based on a poll of 1,100 IT decision-makers and 8,443 remote workers worldwide, states that security took a backseat to business continuity during the pandemic for 76 percent of IT teams. And almost all IT leaders (91 percent) felt the pressure to compromise security for the sake of business continuity.

It also seems that younger workers exerted the most pressure on security pros, as almost half (48 percent) of those aged 18-24 described security tools as a hindrance. Almost a third (31 percent) tried to bypass corporate security policies to get their work done.

Imminent deadlines, vague policies and the lack of communication are at the heart of the issue, the report says. More than half (54 percent) of workers aged 18-24 were more worried about meeting deadlines than exposing their company to a data breach, while 39 percent weren’t sure what their security policies said. Some were even unaware of their organization's security policy to begin with.

“The fact that workers are actively circumventing security should be a worry for any CISO – this is how breaches can be born,” said Ian Pratt, Global Head of Security for Personal Systems, HP. 

“If security is too cumbersome and weighs people down, then people will find a way around it. Instead, security should fit as much as possible into existing working patterns and flows, with technology that is unobtrusive, secure-by-design and user-intuitive. Ultimately, we need to make it as easy to work securely as it is to work insecurely, and we can do this by building security into systems from the ground up.”

Sead Fadilpašić

Sead is a freelance journalist with more than 15 years of experience in writing various types of content, from blogs, whitepapers, and reviews to ebooks, and many more, across sites including Al Jazeera Balkans, TechRadar Pro, IT Pro Portal, and CryptoNews.