Another EU country labels Huawei a security threat

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Another day, another western country that is deeming Huawei a national security risk. This time around, according to Reuters, it's the Czech Republic that wants to make sure it keeps its distance from the Chinese telecoms company.

“China’s laws ... require private companies residing in China to cooperate with intelligence services, therefore introducing them into the key state systems might present a threat,” Dusan Navratil, director of the Czech National Cyber and Information Security Agency (NCISA), said in a statement, Reuters reports.

Navratil added that system administrators, both in the public and private sector, should take 'adequate measures' to protect their critical infrastructure.

Huawei has been dulling its teeth repeating the same sentences over and over again, categorically denying any and all accusations of it working with the Chinese government, willingly or not.

“We categorically deny any suggestion that we pose a threat to national security,” a Huawei spokesperson told Reuters.

“We call for NCISA to provide evidence instead of tarnishing Huawei’s reputation without any proof. There are no laws or regulations in China to compel Huawei, or any other company, to install ‘mandatory back doors’,” he said, a reference to U.S. warnings that Huawei’s network gear could contain ‘back doors’ that would allow Chinese spies to hack into critical network infrastructure.”

Huawei is facing tough pressure from the west. Some countries have outright banned Huawei from building their 5G infrastructure, while others are considering their options. These countries, including Italy, the UK, Australia, Japan, New Zealand and the US, consider Huawei a threat to their national security, claiming the company is helping China conduct espionage against its adversaries.  

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