Google launches automatic adblocker for Chrome

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As of today, Google Chrome users are also proud owners of Google's ad blocking technology

The built-in ad blocker is now officially active, and it should turn browsing the web using Chrome into a more enjoyable experience.

Google says that the system will block ads on sites that violate the standards that were put in place by the Coalition for Better Ads.

Ads that are expected to be filtered by Google's new tool are pop-up ads, large sticky ads, auto-play video ads with sound, and ads that appear on a site with a countdown blocking you before the content loads.

Blocking will occur on a site-by-site basis, and not simply based on certain ad types, so ad serving technology need not worry going out of business.

In a blog post, Google explained the technicalities: “At a technical level, when a Chrome user navigates to a page, Chrome’s ad filter first checks if that page belongs to a site that fails the Better Ads Standards. If so, network requests on the page — such as those for JavaScript or images — are checked against a list of known ad-related URL patterns. If there is a match, Chrome will block the request, preventing the ad from displaying on the page. This set of patterns is based on the public EasyList filter rules, and includes patterns matching many ad providers including Google’s own ad platforms, AdSense and DoubleClick.”

Google said that early results show positive progress for users. As of February 12, 42 per cent of sites which were failing the Better Ads Standards have resolved their issues.

“We're encouraged by early results showing industry shifts away from intrusive ad experiences, and look forwarding to continued collaboration with the industry toward a future where Chrome's ad filtering technology will not be needed,” Google concluded.

Image Credit: Google