Google appeals against record GDPR fine

(Image credit: Image Credit: Asif Islam / Shutterstock)

Google is going to appeal the $50 million fine it was dealt a few days ago by the French data protection watchdog. 

According to reports, Google said it “worked hard to create a GDPR consent process for personalised ads that is as transparent and straightforward as possible”.

In an email statement, the company added the process is “based on regulatory guidance and user experience testing”, and that it worries what kind of effect this fine might have on “publishers, original content creators and tech companies in Europe and beyond”.

The ruling says Google violated GDPR in two ways: it wasn't transparent enough when it comes to creating a Google account through an Android device; and it has “massive and intrusive” data processing practices. When users request information Google has on them, that information gets “spread across multiple pages”, making it “not easily accessible for users”.

"For instance, this is the case when a user wants to have a complete information on his or her data collected for the personalisation purposes or for the geo-tracking service."

When it comes to data processing, the French data watchdog CNIL says the purposes of the processing were too vague and generic, meaning users weren’t able to fully understand them.

Finally, the consent it gathers up for ads personalisation is not valid.

"The information on processing operations for the ads personalization is diluted in several documents and does not enable the user to be aware of their extent," the CNIL said.

The Register argues that what Google did was, more or less, usual practice, and that it will be very hard for CNIL to find European advertisers to live up to this standard.

Image Credit: Asif Islam / Shutterstock