Huawei is suing the US government

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Huawei has announced plans to sue the US government in the latest battle between the Chinese technology giant and lawmakers.

The telecoms and mobile giant is officially challenging a government act which blocked access to its products and services in the US, alleging they are unconstitutional.

"The U.S. Congress has repeatedly failed to produce any evidence to support its restrictions on Huawei products. We are compelled to take this legal action as a proper and last resort," Guo Ping, Huawei Rotating Chairman said in a statement. 

"This ban not only is unlawful, but also restricts Huawei from engaging in fair competition, ultimately harming U.S. consumers. We look forward to the court's verdict, and trust that it will benefit both Huawei and the American people."

Huawei's lawsuit, filed in a federal court in Plano, Texas, concerns Section 889 of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). 

This blocks all US Government agencies from buying Huawei equipment and services as well as barring them from doing business with third parties who buy Huawei equipment or services without any executive or judicial process. 

The company says this violates the Separation-of-Powers principles enshrined in the US Constitution, because Congress is both making the law, and attempting to adjudicate and execute it.

Huawei also argues that the NDAA restrictions are stopping it from sharing its knowledge of 5G technology, slowing the rollout of the next-generation networks across the US. 

The company quotes estimates from unnamed industry sources that claims allowing Huawei to compete would reduce the cost of wireless infrastructure by between 15 and 40 percent, saving at least $20 billion over the next four years across North America.