Intel hit with 32 lawsuits surrounding Meltdown and Spectre


While Intel and other companies affected by the Meltdown and Spectre security flaws have been developing patches to address potential exploits, customers and shareholders have come together to file 32 separate lawsuits against the chipmaker regarding how it handled the flaws. 

At the beginning of January, researchers at Google discovered the two major security flaws that affect almost all of the chips made by Intel, AMD and ARM.

However, Intel was the most affected as unlike AMD, its chips were vulnerable to both Meltdown and Spectre.  The chipmaker has issued a number of patches and fixes for these security flaws but some did more harm than good when they led to slowdowns on users' machines or more frequent reboots. 

Customers whose systems were affected by Meltdown and Spectre quickly brought several class action lawsuits against Intel and now there are 30 in total.  While some of the class action lawsuits deal with the way the company has attempted to fix its affected chips, others are based around its omissions when the flaws were first made public. 

The other two lawsuits that have been brought against Intel are securities class actions in which the plaintiffs claim that Intel and its executives violated securities laws by making false or misleading statements about its products or internal controls.  Three of the company's shareholders were also found to have filed actions against members of its board over how they failed to take action against alleged insider trading. 

Chief Executive Brian Krzanich sold 889,879 shares of Intel's stock for around $39m on November 29th before the details of Meltdown and Spectre were made public and this has led many to believe that his shares were intentionally sold at this time before the news of the security flaws broke. 

Intel is still issuing patches to protect its chips from exploits based on Meltdown and Spectre and we will learn more regarding the outcome of these class action lawsuits as they progress. 

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