IoT needs to be a part of continuity plans, experts say

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There’s a new factor that needs to be taken into consideration when creating a business continuity plan, and that is the Internet of Things.

Research from Databarracks’ has found that a shockingly small amount of companies have policies in place to help protect against IoT threats, meaning they could be at risk of attack from a variety of threats.

The company's latest Data Health Check survey revealed that only 13 per cent of businesses saw IoT threats as a major concern with just 27 per cent of organisations (27 per cent) having set policies in place designed to protect against IoT threats

“The IoT device market is still relatively immature and somewhat of a wild-west," said Databarracks managing director Peter Groucutt. 

"According to industry experts, by 2020 there will be over 50 billion connected devices. Understandably, manufacturers are racing to capitalise on the opportunity, but unfortunately, many are doing so at the expense of basic security measures,” he says.

“Organisations need to be aware of these risks, even if they don’t use any IoT devices – the growing number of connected devices globally means there is an increased risk of DDoS attacks through IoT botnets – but our data suggests firms are ignoring these threats.

"Businesses looking to add IoT to their infrastructure need to keep a few things in mind, like not relying on existing policies, defining risks and putting in place necessary controls to minimise them.”

“The unique challenge of IoT continuity is that the devices, by their nature, are remote and numerous. Remote access, and the ability to apply changes and fixes to multiple devices at once, makes them easier to manage, but that comes with a risk of compromise.”

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