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More and more executives getting involved in business continuity

(Image credit: Image Credit: StartupStockPhotos / Pixabay)

Senior leadership is increasingly taking responsibility for business continuity (BC), new figures have found. 

According to a new report from Databarracks, 25 per cent of CEOs, CFOs, MDs and FDs are now in charge of BC, up from 21 per cent four years ago.

But in 42 per cent of organisations, this is still IT’s responsibility.

Based on a poll of more than 400 IT decision-makers in the UK, the report claims that IT involvement in BC is “gradually decreasing”, saying that fewer IT directors are in charge of BC plans (25 per cent, down from 27), as well as IT managers (17 per cent, down from 22).

“Business continuity is a consideration for leaders across the entire business, not just the IT department,” commented Peter Groucutt, Managing Director at Databarracks.

“It’s fine for IT to be involved, but the overall direction should come from management in the wider business. This is the best way to ensure that BC plans are effectively implemented and embedded throughout the business.”

IT managers, however, are still mostly in charge of the BC planning, followed by IT directors, CEOs and CFOs.

Groucutt added: “It’s important that a wide range of people – including IT leaders – are involved in writing BC plans. But we’re still not seeing enough buy-in from the C-suite. The largest companies generally have a BC manager (or even team) in place, but SMEs won’t normally have a dedicated member of staff for BC. For those that don’t, BC tends to be pushed to IT, rather than being handled by senior management.”