Net neutrality officially dead

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Net neutrality rules have officially expired, meaning ISPs now have greater control over the speeds and services they offer.

The Federal Communications Commission has repealed the net neutrality rules which were set up in 2015 by a 2-3 vote. Now, with net neutrality gone, internet service providers (ISP) can slow down user traffic, block content or offer “internet fast lanes”, or faster speeds for individual services, such as video streaming. The only condition is that they disclose the practices.

The repeal has been met with wide criticism from internet giants like Google and Facebook, from the opposing Democrats, but also from the internet in general.

Ajit Pai, the chairman of the FCC, last week said the rollback will ensure higher investments and will create a “better, faster and cheaper Internet access and more broadband competition to the American people.”

On the other hand, Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat and an FCC Commissioner that was against the repeal, said the decision has put FCC “on the wrong side of history, the wrong side of the law and the wrong side of the American public.”

And speaking of law, a group of 22 states have sued the FCC for this. There’s still no date when oral arguments will take place, though. The biggest winners in this situation are ISPs themselves.

“The internet industry remains committed to restoring net neutrality protections through the courts, legislation, and administrative action. Americans in every state and across the political spectrum support rules that ban ISPs from blocking, throttling, and prioritizing web traffic,” commented The Internet Association.

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