Only one in ten NHS Trusts are fully digitised

(Image credit: Image source: Shutterstock/everything possible)

If the government’s plan for a paperless NHS by 2020 is to be achieved, someone really needs to pick up their pace. New reports are saying that just 12 per cent of NHS Trusts are fully digitised.

The number could still vary, though, given that it was obtained through a Freedom of Information request, with 52 out of 74 Trusts responding.

Just above a third of the Trusts (37 per cent) have said that more than half of their patient records are digital. A quarter (23 per cent) confirmed that up to 99 per cent of patient records are fully digitised. Those records include scans, letters, notes and results.

Most are planning to go full digital soon. A fifth (21 per cent) believes the goal is achievable within two years, and another fifth aims for three to four years. Just 12 per cent have no plans of going digital.

When asked how many paper-based patient records they collected in the fourth quarter of last year, most did not respond. Out of the 16 Trusts that did respond (31 per cent), they’ve collectively created more than 1.7 million paper-based records.

“The ultimate goal is to empower healthcare organisations to evolve working practices and provide better patient care whilst reducing costs. One way to achieve this is to take a digital approach to information management. Through the creation of a “one patient, one record” environment, NHS clinicians can easily access the necessary information – regardless of where it is and in what form – to more effectively commission and monitor services that reflect the needs of patients,” commented Tracey Lethbridge, head of UK public sector at OpenText.

“Ultimately, accurate and timely patient data is at the heart of delivering quality care and will ensure all front-line care staff can access this information where and when it is needed, boosting their productivity and enabling them to help more patients, more quickly.”

Image source: Shutterstock/everything possible