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Organisations are still far off from relying on a single public cloud

(Image credit: Image Credit: Everything Possible / Shutterstock)

In an effort to better how companies are managing their workloads in the cloud, LogicMonitor surveyed 135 cloud professionals at this year's AWS re:Invent conference.

The survey revealed that more than half of respondents are utilising multiple public cloud platforms and 11 per cent have hybrid workloads that combine both on-premise and public cloud.

LogicMonitor's Founder and Chief Evangelist, Steve Francis highlighted just how difficult it can be for businesses to move to a single public cloud platform, saying:

“Moving towards a single public cloud platform sounds tidy. The reality is much messier, with multiple cloud platforms, a mix of cloud and on-premises and even innovative solutions such as VMware Cloud for AWS and Azure Stack.” 

Respondents also reported that while on-premise is still the most popular option for managing workloads, that is quickly changing. They believe that by 2020, on-premise workloads will drop from 46 to 25 per cent while cloud grows from 44 to 67 per cent.

However, hybrid cloud will remain about the same only growing by 11 to 12 per cent.

Those surveyed identified security, cost and compliance as the most important reasons to host workloads on-premise while reliability, performance and flexibility were the most important factors for choosing cloud over on-premise.

When asked if they were utilising multiple cloud platforms, 54 per cent said they were while 28 per cent said they are using multiple cloud platforms strictly in production. Respondents are also starting to use new variants of major cloud platforms including Azure Stack (24%) and VMware on AWS (22%).

LogicMonitor's survey shows that cloud professionals are still a long way off from using a single public cloud platform to handle the entirety of their organisation's workflows. One third of respondents said they will continue to use a mix of cloud and on-premise workloads for six or more years while one in five said they would for 10 years or more.

Image Credit: Everything Possible / Shutterstock